Acacia buxifolia

Box-leaf Wattle

Family: Fabaceae subfamily Mimosoideae

Acacia buxifolia, the Box-leaf Wattle, is a native of Queensland, New South Wales and Victoria.

The Box-leaf Wattle is usually a medium shrub reaching a height of two to four metres. There is a form growing on the Northern Tablelands of NSW that develops into a dwarf shrub reaching a height of one metre.

Phyllodes are from two to three centimetres long by one centimetre wide with a soft point. Sometimes there is a small gland about one third along the phyllode.

Globular flower heads are golden yellow and are carried during spring and early summer. As the flowers fade cut off each branch behind the spent blooms. This promotes fresh growth, more flowers and extends the life of the plants.

The flowers are followed by pods that are 70 centimetres long with a bluish colour (see photo).

 

In the garden

Acacia buxifolia is a hardy and free flowering wattle. Some of the specimens, in our cold climate garden, are over ten years old.

Propagation

Propagate from seed that should be treated with boiling water before sowing. Cutting propagation may be possible.

Other information

The species name refers to the likeness of the phyllodes to the European Box (Buxus) foliage.

By Warren and Gloria Sheather