Acacia acinacea

Gold Dust Wattle

Family: Fabaceae subfamily Mimosoideae

Acacia acinacea is a small to medium shrub that is found in south-eastern South Australia, most of Victoria and southern NSW.

Phyllodes are small, elliptic with an offset mucro (pointed end). There is a small gland near the centre of the phyllode margin. The flowers are in globular heads with 8-20 flowers in each head. Blooms are bright golden and carried in pairs at the base of each phyllode.

Spring is flowering period. This is when this species lives up to its common name. At this time stems really appear to be dusted with gold. Pruning after flowering is beneficial. Pods are linear, up to 50 millimetres long and curled.

Acacia acinacea is colourful and very hardy. We have specimens that are over ten years old in our cold climate garden.

In the garden

Acacia acinacea is colourful and very hardy. We have specimens that are over ten years old in our cold climate garden.

Propagation

Propagate from seed and cuttings.

Other information

The species name possibly refers to the twisted pods.

By Warren and Gloria Sheather